I’m off to Tampa Bay to witness abomination

Tomorrow I will be heading to Brooksville, Florida (about 30 miles north of Tampa), so I won’t be posting any rants over the weekend.  Every year I go there to visit with my nephew and his wife and to attend three inter-league baseball games between the Florida Marlins and Tampa Bay Rays in St. Petersburg.  I’ll be returning home on Monday.  They come to stay with me for the three games the teams play in Miami.  This year those games will be played the following weekend.

Although I thoroughly enjoy the time we spend together on these visits, I hate watching the games there.  Tampa Bay is in the American League, and since they are the home team the games there are played by American League rules.  They use the Designated Hitter (DH).  The DH is an abomination – every bit as evil as permitting offensive, defensive and special teams in football.

When God invented team sports He intended that each player participate in all aspects of the games.  In baseball, His most holy sporting creation, He determined that every person who played in the game must be prepared to throw and catch the ball, field, hit and run the bases.  And, if for any reason it is determined that he should not be permitted to continue to do so, he must depart the game and not return to participate in any other aspect of the game.

The establishment of the DH, an act of most vile and evil men in violation of holy intent, adds an additional participant to each team and sets apart two of them as specialists.  Pitchers don’t have to bat or run the bases.  When their team is at bat they can take a nap, read a book or check out the women in the stands.  On the mound they can throw at opposing batters without fear of retaliation.  Unfortunately, their teammates have to worry, because they have to bat.  The DH has to get up off his butt only four times in a game on average.  The rest of the game he can knit a sweater, or munch on snacks in the locker room.  Most of them either have such minimal skills in other phases of the game that their managers wouldn’t trust them on the playing field, or they are so old that their skills have deteriorated to the extent that they would be unable to perform.  In their roles in the American League neither the pitchers nor the Designated Hitters are baseball players.

Even worse, the use of a DH has brought about the almost total removal of strategy to the game, and the diminution of playing opportunities for non-regular position players.  It has turned one of God’s greatest creations into a total bore.  The American League does not play Baseball – it plays ‘Snoreball’.

Advertisements

3 Comments

Filed under Personal Views

3 responses to “I’m off to Tampa Bay to witness abomination

  1. naturgesetz

    LOL

    Well the DH gives one non-regular position player plenty of opportunities.

    And who could be against something that gets athletes knitting?

    I’m a Red Sox fan, not a baseball fan, so I haven’t thought seriously about this before, but, seriously, you do make good points about strategy and playing opportunities.

    IMO, interleague play before the World Series is also an abomination. Why should the league championship be partially determined by playing non-league teams. If Bud Selig must have interleague play, treat it like exhibition games.

    And while I’m at it, the four best teams in each league should get into the playoffs. Never mind the divisions. And shorten the season. Playing the World Series in November is almost as bad as playing the hockey and basketball championships in May and June.

    Professional sports are being ruined by the lure of TV advertising dollars.

    • Well we certainly are somewhat kindred spirits in this regard.

      I must admit that knitting a sweater would surely be an improvement over chewing sunflower seeds and spitting, or chewing tobacco and spitting, or just spitting! Dugouts would be much neater!

      I feel compelled to confess my Red Sox experience. I have always been a National League fan, but the Sox were my favorite AL team, from way back in the Ted Williams and Bobby Doerr days, through Yaz and Freddy Lynn and Jim Rice. I always liked their uniforms, too – and since I hated the Yankees (as every decent person does) who else in the league was there to root for? But when they finally won the Series I couldn’t abide them! That year, especially, they resembled a group of the kind of people one would walk across the street to avoid. They looked like a local softball team who did their partying BEFORE their games. Lordy, what their physiques did to such otherwise wonderful uniforms! And to think that a former Marlin, Kevin Millar, was one of their leaders! I like them again but still would have to be loyal to my league should they get back to the Series.

      I totally agree about inter-league play. I visualize a situation in which a rained out inter-league game has to be replayed in order to finalize the playoffs of one league, and a team out of contention from the other league determines who makes the playoffs. Inter-league play is unfair to AL teams when their pitchers have to bat, and unfair to NL teams when players must DH who are totally unfamiliar with sitting around waiting to hit.

      I want the 154 game season back – – and double headers on Sundays and Holidays – – and World Series Games in early October – – and played in the daytime! I want to go back to the days when there was no fear that a pitcher’s arm would fall off if he throws more than 100 pitches!

      In short, I want to go back to 1955 and be 17 again – – but I want to take my PC and Internet with me!

  2. naturgesetz

    Well, I was only 12 in 1955, but that sounds good. Day games and double headers — just the thing. A night game on Saturday or Sunday is ridiculous. I’ve been wondering why fans in the bleachers don’t know enough to take their shirts off, and you’ve given me the answer: night games have destroyed the tradition.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s